3 Tips to Improve Your Email Deliverability

The world of email marketing is constantly changing. Whether you are fundraising, promoting products, or building awareness, communications strategies are different than they were just a few years ago.

There was a time when email was a guaranteed way to get a message into someone’s inbox. But the volume of emails being sent and received has multiplied which causes a lot of activity that can annoy recipients. To win and please customers, email providers have raised the bar for what qualifies an email to reach its intended inbox.

Here are three strategies that can give your emails a fighting chance of actually making it to your recipients.

  1. Sender Authority. Mass emails need to come from and through somewhere. Most of the major email providers today have robust platforms with good relationships with all the big email servers. But you are responsible for authenticating your domain and “from” email address to prove that your email platform has permission to send emails from your website’s domain. It’s a simple but technical step, but if you skip it, a lot of your emails can go unseen.
  2. Relevance. Users need to want to receive your emails. If they don’t, they will not open them or engage with them. The more your emails are ignored, the more the algorithm is trained to see them as irrelevant, and the more you will end up in peoples spam folder, or worse — your emails will bounce and be undeliverable. This has a cumulative effect over time on all the emails sent by your domain. You must be relevant to your recipients. And make sure you only acquire new emails that want what you have to offer.
    Email frequency is worth mentioning here as well. Sending emails often can still be effective, but they must all be relevant, or it could have a negative effect on user experience and deliverability. Better to segment your list and send specific communications only to the segments that would appreciate them most.
  3. Engagement. Every time a user opens your email, re-opens it, clicks on something, or even files the email into a folder, they are sending signals that effect deliverability algorithms. They are saying they want this email, it is quality, and they want to see more like it from you. You must provide content that is truly engaging, and it helps to design your emails in a way that gives multiple opportunities for engagement.
    There is a time and a place for a focused email with only one user option. But make that the exception and not the rule. If you can provide multiple engagement points, then you can get more users to take an action. More users taking multiple actions indicates a high level of interest. Over time, this has an cumulative effect that improves the deliverability of the emails you send in general.

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